SELF PORTRAITS












INVITATION CARDS FOR GRANDPARENTS AND FRIENDS DAY







Handprint Doodle Art


How to make a Worry Doll





Term 1 2017


Easter Origami

Rabbit


Egg Holder


Origami Rabbbit






Peter Gossage - rhymes with sausage

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A New Zealand artist and author known and rememebred for retelling Maui stories.

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His style is described as "Stained Glass Window"





Imagination Portraits

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We will create these portraits for our first art project.

Use the elements of drawing when drawing your 'Greatness'.
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Christmas Origami








Sketching Skills









Keith Haring Artist


Task: Choose an action shot of you at camp to re create in the style of Keith Haring.

Analyse Keith Haring's art.
What is his style?
How does he show action and movement?
What do you notice about the colour? lines? shapes? design? space?

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Watch the you tube clip to learn how easy it is to draw stick figures.
Practice some stick figures showing action from camp.
rock climbing, paddle boarding, Blokarts, drift carts, surfing, blob, water slide etc
Choose your best one to turn into an art piece.

Learning Steps
1. watch the video on how to draw stick figures
2. practice in your thinking and planning book
3. choose one figure you want to enlarge
4. check in, check in, check in.
5 re do
6. sharpie outline
7. paint


Japanese Notan - A study in light and dark design. It's all about balance.




Origami



3D Line Drawing





Science Art




Masterpiece to Mathematics: Using Art to learn Fractions, Decimals and Percentages



Design your own 'Wall of Colour' using up to 6 different colours on a 10x10 grid (that's the easiest way to work out the maths).
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When you have finished colouring the maths starts.
1. Count all the squares of one colour.
2. Write the simplest fraction.
3. Write it as a decimal.
4 Write the amount as a percentage.




Escher

Article by Jenni Back and Liz Pumfrey

Published February 2011.

Have you ever noticed how mathematical ideas are often used in patterns that we see all around us? Sometimes it is hard to decide when maths becomes art, or vice-versa.


external image castrovalva.gif
One artist who may have agreed with this is Maurits Cornelius Escher . He was born in 1898, in the Netherlands, and showed great artistic talent from an early age. At first Escher concentrated on sketching scenery and things around him. However, on a visit to Alhambra in Spain, he became fascinated by the Arabic tessellating patterns contained in the tiles, and started to experiment more with shapes and mirror images. In the late 1920s people began to recognise his style.


This is called "Castrovalva", a mountainside village, and was finished in 1930

All M.C. Escher works (c) 2001
Cordon Art - Baarn - Holland.
All rights reserved. Used by permission .



Gradually, Escher's work began to change. Rather than drawing what he saw, Escher started to express ideas he had in his mind. He was able to create spatial illusions and detailed repeating patterns.



external image nightandday.jpg
All M.C. Escher works (c) 2001 Cordon Art - Baarn - Holland. All rights reserved. Used by permission.


This picture was completed in 1930 and is called "Day and Night". Can you see how Escher has used black and white bird silhouettes to show the change from day to night?

In 1936, Escher made a second trip to Alhambra. After this, his pictures external image butterflies.gif
contained more shapes, which were often transformed by reflections, rotations and translations. This produced amazing tessellations.


Can you see the butterfly motifs here?
This picture is made up of identical parallelograms which have been shifted diagonally.


All M.C. Escher works (c) 2001 Cordon Art - Baarn - Holland. All rights reserved. Used by permission.

external image parrots.jpg

Look at these parrots.


Can you work out how they have been moved to make this pattern?

All M.C. Escher works (c) 2001 Cordon Art - Baarn - Holland.
All rights reserved. Used by permission .



You can try your own tessellating patterns with any shape.


Escher's popularity in America was increasing and he was now in demand as a lecturer in art, maths and sciences. Mathematicians had been admiring his work since the early 40s and their numbers were growing.


Escher's drawings began to show a new theme towards the late 1950s. He perfected a technique known as "showing infinity" which gave the impression that his sketches were endless. He did this by making the objects gradually smaller towards the edge of the paper. Have a look!

external image circle.jpg

All M.C. Escher works (c) 2001 Cordon Art - Baarn - Holland. All rights reserved. Used by permission .
This is called "Circle Limit IV" and was finished in 1960.


Unfortunately, Escher became quite ill, although he did see his first book of prints published which gained him even greater recognition. He died in March 1972.


So, what do you think?

Was Escher an artist or a mathematician?


Discuss it with your friends!


You can find out more about this fascinating man from these websites:

All M.C. Escher works (c) 2001 Cordon Art - Baarn - Holland. All rights reserved. Used by permission .

Mixed Media

Whaea Jude taught the class about Sgraffito, a technique where you scrape away a surface layer to create your art work. These are an example.

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Our pieces used koru to depict a message about family. Have a look in our class.

Thanks to Reed and buddies for displaying them.